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  1. #11
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: hardware storage

    Looks great!

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  2. #12

    Re: hardware storage

    Nice cabinet. I priced those panels out from grainger and if I remember right they were kind of pricey. I also wondered how stable they would be with the longer bins like the 10" or 18" bins loaded up with nuts and bolts. We had a pre made cabinet like that at a place I worked at and it was pretty nice, had the panels inside and also on the doors. Was well built and held a lot but I think it was close to a grand for one cabinet.

  3. #13
    Administrator Cebby's Avatar
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    Re: hardware storage

    Quote Originally Posted by jmh21586 View Post
    Here's mine. Louvered panels and bins from Northern Tool. Built a frame around it and put some doors on it.
    I like that. I had open bins like that, but not enclosed. That meant all the dust/dirt/debris in my shop ended up in them along with their original contents.

    You can never have too much small part storage like that. Nice work.

  4. #14
    Registered User Glenn's Avatar
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    Re: hardware storage

    I am not sure why people are hesitant to build anything with wood. It does not make you less of a man, nor is it inferior. Wood is plenty strong (we do build houses with it. LOL!)

    The plywood "shelf" setup is fantastic. It beats the hell out of my 800 coffee cans and other tubs that I have laying around. LOL!

    These are all some great ideas guys.
    Glenn H. Shelton III
    My Garage Pics

  5. #15

    Re: hardware storage

    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn View Post
    I am not sure why people are hesitant to build anything with wood. It does not make you less of a man, nor is it inferior. Wood is plenty strong (we do build houses with it. LOL!)

    The plywood "shelf" setup is fantastic. It beats the hell out of my 800 coffee cans and other tubs that I have laying around. LOL!

    These are all some great ideas guys.
    all the "metal guys" I know refuse to work wood. I am one of the few who do both. but I was "doing wood" long before i started fooling with metal

    archie =) =) =)
    Cincinnatti 18X96 lathe, Atlas 12X36lathe, Bridgeport R2E4 mill, Steinel 4V mill, Lincoln stick,Lincoln MIG, Linde UCC-305 TIG http://jeep534.smugmug.com

  6. #16
    Registered User Neuswede's Avatar
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    Re: hardware storage

    Yes, there is a definite divide between wood and metal. I have built most of my shelving and storage items from wood, but friends do comment whenever they see me cutting lumber, knowing I spend alot of time with metal. Even the contractor who installed the kitchen counter tops a few weeks ago commented on my cabinet installation, hardwood floors and trim work. He says he rarely any metal guys who can work with wood.

  7. #17
    Registered User Neuswede's Avatar
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    hardware storage and other storage

    felt compelled to dig out some pics of the last shop. For most f my stuff, I have smaller items stored in tool boxes with the tools they go with. For plumbing, all the fittings, pvc stuff, glue and primer, pex cutter, tube cutter, shark bites, etc. all go in the box with pump pliers, faucet wrench and related tools. Same goes for having a trim carpentry and electrical tool box. I have a big box for the hammer drill and bigger bits, fasteners and stuff when working with Tap-Cons, concrete anchors, etc.

    For the car stuff, I tend to keep stuff sorted by where they will be used. The hardware that needs to go with the car to the track is stored in plastic boxes, labeled as to what they are. I tend to like my boxes of uniform size and comparable design so they fit well together and are easily moved from place to place. I have a Facom (pronounced Fah-comb) roller cabinet that goes to the track, so most of the boxes need to fit in the lower storage area of this box. I keep fuses, relays, electrical connectors, shrink tube, zip ties, connectors and Weather-Pak stuff in similar large compartment boxes for this purpose, along with soldering tools, wire strippers, Weather-Pak tools and test equipment (meter, jumpers, patch cables, etc.)

    For hardware storage, I tend to like the Plano or Flambeau divider storage boxes for most of my nuts, screws ny-locs and washers. They seal closed and I hate having dust and debris in with my hardware. For storage, I found this blue Standard Brand cabinet on ebay. It's a 2 piece deal, with a drawer in the middle, and is very handy for storing my kind of stuff.

    Attachment 733

    For my tool drawers, I also have several sizes of the plastic boxes: you can see in my roller cabinet that I keep my various air tool fittings, wrenches and stuff in the same drawer with the tools that they service. I also make up various storage boxes to fit my needs, such as with pop rivets and rivet gun; I'll use a big box to hold the gun, and have a smaller multi-compartment box for the rivets. Likewise for my Weather-pak connectors; the tools get stored in a box with the connectors.
    Attachment 734


    One of my favorite re-use items was an old steel letter/literature tray, given to me by a friend. He had no idea what I could use it for, but I immediately saw a nice way to keep sand paper sheets very handy and neatly organized, seen above the workbench. Seen here is a before/after of the work bench in my last shop. When I moved in, it was a complete mess. After some clean-up, I was left with this old bench that was in very poor condition, so I made a few structural changes, and redesigned it to serve both as a work surface and have lots of extra storage below.

    Attachment 735

    Sometime back in 2004 or 2005, I moved into my first shop, and was given this old plumber's work table, made from steel tube and very heavy casters. Unfortunately, it had little if any storage space beneath. I created this double level storage rack which holds both flat(sheet metal) stock, as well as having compartments for round tube, bar stock, or square tube. I have since fabricated a metal brake that fits into the tube ends in the frame, so I have a work surface for longer sheets when bending, and the plan is to eventually add a tube bender to the other end when I get moved into the new shop.

    Attachment 737

    As I said in an earlier post, I do tend to work with wood frequently, so here's a small rack I made in my last shop's parts room. I needed a place to store cans, but also wanted an integral paper towel roll and a place for my hand cleaner.
    Attachment 736

    Marc

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