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Thread: Hammer drills

  1. #1

    Hammer drills

    Looks like my Ryobi 14V drill batteries are giving up the ghost so it's a perfect excuse to upgrade. I'm looking at the Ridgid 18V cordless hammer drill or a Milwaukee Hammer drill/impact combo kit.

    Here's the Ridgid $250 http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R8411503...t/EN/index.htm

    And here's the Milwaukee $288
    http://www.toolbarn.com/product/milwaukee/0824-24P/

    So for $38 more I can get an impact wrench and Li-ion batteries. I think that's the way I'm going, but wanted to hear what you guys thought too.

    Anybody tried using cordless for drilling into a concrete foundation? Is it an exercise in futility and I should rent a real hammer drill? Also, how do I find out if my foundation is pre-stressed concrete or not?

  2. #2
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: Hammer drills

    Never used a cordless. I only have used corded hammer drills.

    Was your foundation pre-fabbed? That's the only way it could be pre-stressed is if it was fabbed at a facility. I have never, ever seen concrete pre-stressed on site. Ever. Post-stressed - yes.

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  3. #3
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    Re: Hammer drills

    I have used, and use cordless stuff, but for anything more than light drilling and screw driving, I prefer corded commercial/industrial rated equipment. But, then, I'm an old guy, sort of stodgy and set in my ways, too. My reasoning is: I hate messing with changing batteries, and it never fails that you get right in the middle of something, and the machine starts sloo-oo-oooooo-o-o-w-i-n-g d--o--w----n-------n, and stops; agravates the s**&^ out of me. And, since I almost always have a cord laying around, or an outlet close by, I just use my good old heavy duty stuff. For things like drilling concrete, you run the chance of getting the bit stuck if the drill slows down and the hammer rate slows, so that is a further consideration. If I'm going to drill more than for setting small anchors or shields, I prefer a full tilt "roto-hammer" - for deep holes, or ones over a quarter inch.
    How'd you do that? How's that work??
    EMF - Breakin', Fixin' and Messin' with stuff for over fifty years.
    Retired Electrician, Lineman, Millwright.

  4. #4

    Re: Hammer drills

    I'm probably only going to need 4-6 holes for bolting down a couple safes in my house. Didn't know the bit could get stuck. Good to know.

  5. #5
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: Hammer drills

    My advice on concrete drilling (lots of experience in thick arsed, reinforced industrial floors here):

    Retract completely every so often. The deeper you go, the more frequently you need to retract. No need to retract for the first 3X or so of diameter (2.25" for a 3/4" drill, 1.5" for a 1/2" drill, etc).

    Let the drill do the work. Don't push very hard - just light to medium pressure on the drill (or no pressure at all for smaller holes like 1/4") and it should walk right through. Let it bounce just a little bit - especially before you retract - to loosen up the column of dust in the flutes.

    Use a vacuum to clean out the hole. Tape a short piece of hose to the end of a shop vac and clean out the hole if it's deeper than maybe 10X the diamater of the bit (8" for a 3/4" hole, 5" for a 1/2" hole). It's a through hole, ignore this step.

    Keep in mind I don't know what the hell you are drilling or how big the holes will be!

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

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