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  1. #11
    Administrator Cebby's Avatar
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    Re: You can never have enough vises

    All of a sudden, I think my vise is painfully inadequate...

  2. #12
    Registered User Glenn's Avatar
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    Jul 2006
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    Central Florida
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    Re: You can never have enough vises

    I am thinking the same thing.
    Glenn H. Shelton III
    My Garage Pics

  3. #13

    Re: You can never have enough vises

    Here is the small one. It's a HF, but it's really not too bad, about 120 lbs @ a buck a pound.


    William...
    My shop pictures

    1998 Dodge 3500 12 Valve TST 10, 3K GSK, ddp stage IV injectors, SB con-Fe
    1987 Chevy 3500 24 valve Cummins, Nv4500, DD#2 injectors, Edge Comp
    1955 Ford F100
    1941 Chevy Panel

  4. #14
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: You can never have enough vises

    Nice vises, guys! Keep the photos coming!

    I don't have the model info yet - it is covered by many layers of crap. I will post a follow up when I finish scraping off the layers of character......

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  5. #15

    Re: You can never have enough vises

    Scott,
    Watch that patina!!!! You don't want to lessen the value of that vise. A smart decorator would use the vise as a counterpoint to all your Smurfed equipment.

  6. #16

    Re: You can never have enough vises

    Here is my cheap o TSC vise, it works pretty good for the 2 things I do with it:
    1. I put my beer on the flat spot
    2. I mar the finish on stuff

  7. #17
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: You can never have enough vises

    Well - it's time for an update.

    The jaws in this not-so-well-cared-for vise were welded in place at some point in the distant past. I carefully cut the old jaws away and discovered the reason for the welding - the beds were in pretty rough shape. It appeared that the original jaws were held in place with only pins and a tongue and groove arrangement. None of these features were salvageable.

    After it's day at the spa (bath, scrubbing, oil, etc), the vise was clamped shut against a steel block and the bottom surface was skimmed flat. I did not want to fracture this thing by anchoring it to the welding table if the bottom was not flat. Then, both jaw beds were re-cut. While I had it in a happy place on the mill, I took the opportunity to skim the anvil and partially true up the top edges and the sides. I located a new set of jaws and proceeded to drill and tap the retaining screw threads.

    It now leads a happier life sitting there looking all pretty.

    No patina was harmed during this event.

    Well, not all that much....

    Scott
    Last edited by MXtras; 10-24-2007 at 01:14 AM.
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  8. #18
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: You can never have enough vises

    And for an encore - a square shaft, 5" Wilton. I do not know how old this one is but the castings looked to be of a pre-Asia vintage.

    This vise was a mess. All mating surfaces were machined and bronze bushings were fashioned for the screw - both for thrust and rotation of the screw. It had no screw when it wandered into my shop, but luckily a stray was discovered and put into service. The end result is a really precise feeling shop vise - it has probably less than .010" backlash in the screw (threads included) and spins smoothly without all the typical slop. New jaws sit comfortably in machined beds.

    Now I need a better handle for it and some dedicated, double V-groove soft jaws.

    It came without a swivel base, so a base was liberated and the two were machined to fit eachother. A bronze bushing was made for the pivot point, also. The rotational slot in the base was trued up and the locking screw was made to fit the assembly - except for the top portion. I ran out of enthusiasm.

    This vise resides on my machining table and will never see much abuse.

    Lots of patina was harmed in this event. Lots.

    Scott
    Last edited by MXtras; 10-24-2007 at 01:39 AM.
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  9. #19
    Registered User
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    Sep 2007
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    cochranville,pa.
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    15

    Re: You can never have enough vises

    That looks like the vice down at the shop. You can`t kill em. Just. stand back when you start spinning that handle. Glenn

  10. #20
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Nov 2005
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    Somewhere in Virginia
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    Re: You can never have enough vises

    I have popped myself in the hip and on the knees with the handle on that thing more than once. It doesn't stop when it hits you, either....

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

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