Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in Virginia
    Posts
    891

    Talking Vibratory Tumbler/Automated Deburring

    Long, long story but I have been needing one of these things for a while to deburr my milled parts. Hundreds and hundreds of them. Literally.

    It's not the kind of purchase that anyone I know is really all that excited about, I guess, but for me it's another learning adventure. Plus it's something else for me to Smurf and you all know what that does to my pulse....

    I thought about building a home-brewed vibratory tumbler, but rather than building, I purchased. I just don't have the time anymore.

    It's an Advanced Finishing, 1.5 CuFt unit with completely adjustable amplitude. The roll and rotation of media can be altered independently which gives me lots of things to screw with, making the experience seem more adventurous. Luckily, the thing came with the original manual for inexperienced idiots like myself so when I adjust it to the point where it no longer functions, I can read the directions and get it working again.

    It appears to me to be a very nice commercial unit. I will find out tomorrow what this sells for new but I am guessing around $8K. I picked it up for less than 1/10 of that! Right place at the right time kinda thing. I know - I suck.

    It was located about 2.5 hours from me and the guy used it to polish jewelry. He had a bit of media and cleaning solutions which I chose to aquire also, but I am not sure they will come into use anytime soon as I am not looking to polish anything. But then again, now that I have the easy way out, I might just find a few thousand things to shine up!

    He also gave me a heavy duty timer/controller. Cool.

    The pics are after clean up. It wasn't too dirty, but introducing foreign germs into my shop gives me the willies, so I had to give it a cursory bath - pressure washer/Super Clean style. It cleaned up pretty good. The color doesn't match the rest of my stuff but it will do (for now). I will likely 'smurf' it later...

    I will post additional updates as I become more educated on using this thing.

    Until then, please feel free to offer up any suggestions/experience and sources for media to deburr flat, smallish, profile-milled aluminum parts (1/4" thick, ~2" wide by ~4" long with slots and a few 5/16" holes)....and any advice!

    :cheers:

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  2. #2
    Registered User Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    342

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    That's pretty cool. It is not something most people go looking for so it is a little unique. At least now I know where I can get my polishing done. LOL!
    Glenn H. Shelton III
    My Garage Pics

  3. #3
    Administrator Cebby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    1,300

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    What sort of media do you use with something like that?
    My vehicle sites: 1993 Toyota 4Runner & 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

    **NEW** - UZswap.com - a site dedictated to sharing tech about swapping Toyota V8's into 4Runners and Trucks

  4. #4
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in Virginia
    Posts
    891

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    Since I will be deburring aluminum parts, I am likey going to use a fairly aggressive, ceramic, cone shaped media. The stuff is a bit expensive and this thing takes about 50 pounds to fill from what I understand.

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  5. #5
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in Virginia
    Posts
    891

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    Here's my current shop project. It's a stainless tank for the pump on the tumbler.

    Just like everything else I do, a 5 gallon bucket was not satisfactory - I had to go and make it a project.

    I don't mess with stainless too often and I haven't messed with sheet metal in several years, so this was a pretty interesting project for me. Especially due to the wacked out shape.

    I started out with a cardboard mock-up of what I thought I wanted. It fit the machine and it fit the bill, so it's the direction I went. I now wish I had done it a bit differently, but it's moving forward. Start to finish, the cardboard mock-up took a little more than an hour.

    Next, I trimmed strips from a large, no longer used stainless guard I liberated from work. One strip will be the majority of the tank although its a bit short to make the entire perimeter. No biggie. I suppose I should have sheared them but I do not have quick access to a shear and my sheetmetal buddy was not available, so I cut them with a cut-off blade on a 4.5" grinder. It took about 50 minutes to cut two strips. Not too efficient but it was done.

    I then went to my buddy's sheetmetal shop and rolled one of the strips to match the cardboard profile and I threw a few bends in it. I rolled a few tight radii in the other strip for the rest of the tank which is not yet complete. This part took about 4 hours. Well, the rolling took maybe 15 minutes.

    I then butchered the bottom sheet using the same inefficient approach - cut off wheel. Cutting the bottom took maybe 30 minutes. It came out really well.

    I then tacked it together and proceeded to seam weld it. I used essentially no filler - I inset the bottom panel so that there was about 1MM (.040") of material sticking up which was melted down as an even bead of filler. The only place filler was used was in two corners. The welding took about 1:45 and came out watertight - no gaps and no holes although there were a few spots near the tack welds that started to sink through to the back. Oh well - it's not what I wanted but I don't weld thin stainless often.

    More in few.....

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  6. #6
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in Virginia
    Posts
    891

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    There is a boss sticking out of the tumbler's base where I wanted this tank to mount so the side of the tank had to have a window cut out for this depression and the depression had to be covered up water tight. This is also going to help attach the tank to the base although I altered the mounting method after the recess was all welded up.

    Once again, I resorted to cardboard to mock up the shape of the recess cover, then trimmed it out of the S/S sheet and folded it. I then capped it and seam welded it together. I knew it could not be pieced together in the tank too easily.

    The cutout in the tank took a while to get right and so far was the biggest challenge - and the most fun other than the welding. The basic shape of the cut out was intuitive, but the edge where the arc of the tank and the angled, flat bottom of the recess meet took a bit of trial and error. This was mocked-up also.

    Once the cutout and the recess shape matched, it was seam welded. Again - I left just a little material sticking up to use as filler. I had to use filler in the lower corners because the corners were mistakenly cut square instead of a radius.

    Oh - in the last pic you can see where I had to add some length to the sides of the little wedge insert. I trimmed it while I was asleep, apparently and it was nowhere close to square, so I had to add about 1/4".

    These steps took about 3 hours to complete.

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  7. #7
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in Virginia
    Posts
    891

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    This is the basic tank, ready for a test fit.

    It fit as expected since each step was modeled by the super high tech carboard.

    Now it needs to be secured and it will get a pump mount, a highly sophisticated, top secret, super efficient filtration system and a lid or two.

    More updates when progress is made - might be a while, though. This project is not a priority yet so I am working on it when I have some breathing room.



    Scott
    Last edited by MXtras; 01-07-2008 at 03:01 PM. Reason: Secrete is not the same as secret. (spelling error)
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  8. #8
    Registered User Glenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    342

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    Nice.

    Sure wish I had your free time. LOL! (No such thing right?)
    Glenn H. Shelton III
    My Garage Pics

  9. #9
    Administrator Cebby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    1,300

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    Looks great Scott. Is it working as advertised?
    My vehicle sites: 1993 Toyota 4Runner & 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

    **NEW** - UZswap.com - a site dedictated to sharing tech about swapping Toyota V8's into 4Runners and Trucks

  10. #10
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Somewhere in Virginia
    Posts
    891

    Re: Vibrate me, yo

    It holds water so it does what its 'spoda do. No leaks.

    It holds around five gallons which caught me off guard. It doesn't look big enough but a 5 gallon bucket doesn't lie.

    Scott
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

Similar Threads

  1. chamfer or deburring tool
    By outlawcrewcab in forum Metal Grinding/Dressing/Finishing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-04-2006, 03:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •