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Thread: tool brand

  1. #11

    Re: tool brand

    hand tools i use craftsmen i was a porsche tech for 5 years and i dont like how thin the snap ons are they dont fit my fat hands right. have a few husky tools. Also was nice if and when i messed up a tool i could run down to sears and get a new one not wait a week for tool truck to swing buy then 99% time have to order it in so 2 weeks down.

    drills and grinders dewalt

    welder and plasma miller only way!!!

  2. #12
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: tool brand

    What is the draw to Snap-on? Why are they the best tools out there - because they cost so fricking much? Because they are a status symbol? Why do you say they are the best?

    Oh - and yes, I can speak from experience - I am not just a board rambler. I was a Master ASE certified Auto Mechanic in 1986 and then spent many years working on large (16V192) Dietroit diesels at Western Branch Diesel in VA. I worked tractor/trailers, generator set, boats, tugs and ships after I got away from cars. So I can say that if you have to stock your box with Snap-on stuff, then you are working to make the Snap-on man wealthy and you should maybe spend your money a bit more wisely.

    I have broken Snap-on as much as Proto, Mac, Craftsman. Sears is open on Sunday - will your Snap-on guy even answer his fricking phone during the week, let alone on a Sunday afternoon?

    Snap-on is nice stuff, but I can accomplish anything that anyone else can with my various array of 'inferior' tools and I don't owe the Snap-on man my paycheck for the rest of my career.

    I just don't get the attraction to the over-priced tools anymore. I know that you are not considered worthy unless you work with Snap-on in most shops but I over came that issue by not really giving a crap about image and concentrated on getting the job done correctly. It makes absolutely no sense to pay their prices when an 'inferior' Craftsman wrench will perform equally as well. The Snap-on wrenches absolutely suck....but they are Snap-on - yeah, they are unconfortable to use because they are so stupidly thin, but they are Snap-on - they are the best. Why?

    Oh - sorry for the rant....the Snap-on flag wavers really get me going - can you tell? They are hooked on Snap-on's image and advertising...

    For me - it's Mac, Proto, Craftsman, Snap-on - I have a little of every brand. Craftsman ratches absolutely suck.

    Torque Wrenches - Proto
    For welders - Miller or Esab
    For electric - anything but Makita lately and DeWalt is not impressing me either.
    For air - previously IR, but now I am not sure - jury is still out

    Scott
    Last edited by MXtras; 11-08-2005 at 01:57 PM.
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  3. #13
    Administrator Cebby's Avatar
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    Re: tool brand

    WOW! Tell us how you really feel....

    It's funny, I worked with Snap On wrenches a good while ago and noticed the same thing - really thin and they hurt my hands. I never really said much though because of the mystique, whether earned or not.

    I do really like Snap On's screwdrivers. Their handle shape is the most comfortable I've used (for my meat hooks)

    Re: Hand tools, I fall into the "if Craftman was good enough for my dad, why venture beyond that". So I haven't. Their ratchets have been OK for me - primarily because I don't know anything else. What is a reasonable upgrade?

    You hit the nail on the head though for the attraction to Craftsman/Sears. They are open on Sunday and have most normal stuff in stock. Hell, they just built a new Sears about 8 minutes from my house. Plus, I don't have to spend $10K to get the rep's attention either...

    Now the question remains, what do I outfit my on-board 4x4 toolbox with? Craftsman, or can I get by with something else?

  4. #14
    Contributing Member MXtras's Avatar
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    Re: tool brand

    I must admit that the only ratchets I own are all Snap-on except for my 3/4" drive. I think Snap-on makes a really good ratchet - I have had many of mine since I was very young and a few were hand-me-downs from my Dad.

    I was installing ball joints on an old Dodge van a few years back and broke all three of the sockets of that size (whatever size it was - 13/16"? - can't recall) - one was Craftsman, one was Snap-off and one was Blackhawk. It was a weekend and Sears was open, of course. Problem solved. You can't get that convenience from Snap-on.

    Maybe if their sevice and convenience was equivalent it would help justify the price of Snap-on, but I have trouble getting past the typical Snap-on salesman's errogance, too. The ones I dealt with acted like they just barely had time to help you and many times ordering stuff was a fiasco - weeks and weeks would go by and there was excuse after excuse, but no tool.

    Sorry for the rant.... I just can not stand the "Snap-on is absolutely the best" statement. Where is the justification for stating that they are the best? The best in which category and by what measure? It's an advertising ploy and the working public, for the most part, bought it. It's a status symbol for many. Amazing.

    Scott
    Last edited by MXtras; 11-07-2005 at 01:57 PM.
    If it wasn't for the last minute I wouldn't get anything done

  5. #15

    Re: tool brand

    Snap-on is the best for hand tools such as screwdrivers, sockets, wrenches, ratchets, etc. They are overpriced in general but that can be overcome by purchasing them used from techs getting out of the business (I am going to look at a bunch more snap-on and mac stuff from a retiree next weekend)

    Even if you have to buy them new, the screwdrivers, wrenches, and rachets from snap-on are worth it. I use them every day and have tried other brands.

    Sunex impact sockets are not too expensive and work as well as snap-ons

    Don't bother with snap-on air tools. IngersollRand makes the best air tools in the world at half the price of snap-on or mac.

    As far as service, a snap-on man makes a good living off of you and his service should reflect that. I have my Snap-on mans cell and home phone numbers.

  6. #16

    Wink Re: tool brand

    Hand tools, I have an eclectic selection: Britool and Kamasa, some Proto, and odd bits of Snap-On I inherited from my old man. Pliers are Bahco, along with some screwdrivers.

    Power tools, all my metalworking kit is blue Bosch or Makita - does what I want without protest. Welders are Clarke and SIP.

    I have a "multi-level" view on tool-buying: things I make a living with or use a lot, I buy the best I can (hence scissors at 60 a pair!), stuff I use once a year or for stuff I'm hopeless at, I buy what works. For instance, I am a *very* ordinary carpenter, and whether I have a Lie-Nielsen plane at 150 or a chinese plane at 15, doesn't make any difference, so I save the money and buy better metalworking tools.

    What about "consumables"? There's no point in spending big money on a drill and putting cheap p.o.s. bits in that won't make a hole through cheese, or welding elctrodes where the coating is made from something that got swept off the floor, is there?

    M

  7. #17

    Re: tool brand

    like my sign says, i use only Snap-On tools. for cordless, i use dewalt 18 volt. i have nearly everything dewalt makes in 18v & love it all.

  8. #18
    Administrator Cebby's Avatar
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    Re: tool brand

    Quote Originally Posted by knucklehead
    like my sign says, i use only Snap-On tools. for cordless, i use dewalt 18 volt. i have nearly everything dewalt makes in 18v & love it all.
    How's the 18V angle grinder? I was considering one.

  9. #19
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    Re: tool brand

    I agree that Snap-On is the best and I have some pieces as well. It's tough to justify the price tag however so most of my stuff is Craftsman.

    I also have some hand me down stuff that is S-K, Williams, Bonney, etc. It's all good. I hate the no name crap that breaks the first time you use them.
    In my family, goodness is just badness that hasn't had a drink yet. -Christopher Titus

  10. #20
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    Re: tool brand

    With tools, I think sometimes brands matter, sometimes they don't. I like my Blue Point (Snap-On makes them) combo wrenches. They are thin, but much longer than Craftsman. I can feel the difference, much more positive bite on the fastener. On the other hand, I only have them in metric because I use them the most. My SAE wrenches are Craftsman and they get the job done fine, but don't feel as nice. I can notice the difference in Snap-On screwdrivers, so I use them. They really do grip a screw where other brands would have rounded it out. Float bowl screws are famous for that. For pliers, most of the time, as long as they're a good set, it doesn't matter to me. The exceptions to this rule are my pistol grip snap-on needle nose and my big ass Mac dykes. I've yet to find another brand that makes either of these that works as good. Sockets are a different story. 99% of the time, I think any of the major brands are all pretty good. I do the vast majority of my work on Japanese motorcycle engines where space is always limited. I find that I run into space issues much more than car guys. And Snap-On sockets do have a thinner wall thats bailed me out a few times. So I have Snap-On sockets, but again, only in metric, my SAE stuff is Craftsman (And some S-K). Anything thats so tight it may break a socket I switch to impact sockets and don't usually break them. The only sockets I've ever broken were Craftsman and S-K, not really because they were inferior, but because I was probably being a little hard on them. For me tools are about what works, not about brand. I even have a few items from places like Wal-mart. I have a complete set of metric deep well impact sockets from Wally world, and I've yet to break one, even on extremely stuck bolts, using my big ass impact (Snap-On). I don't have much Mac stuff, not because I don't think it's as good, but because the Mac guy that came to the shop when I was a tech was a dick, so I was pretty loyal to the Snap-On guy. I'm not a Snap-On flag waver, but in some cases I think they make the best tool for the job, when they do, I buy it. When they don't, I'll buy any brand that will work. The only tool purchase I ever really regretted was my box itself. I have a Blue Point (Snap-On) box that set me back about $1800. I could have gotten a much larger box for less money if I'd have went with another brand. Sure, Snap-on uses thicker metal and yadda yadda yadda, and you can park a car in the drawers, but I just don't see how I'm getting any bennifit from that ability. If I had to do it over again, I'd get one of those stainless steel tool boxes from Sams Club. They're bigger than mine and only cost like $800.

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